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Opinions 24 June 2019, 11:31

author: Daniel Stronski

Seven Open-World Games that Switch Needs

Cyberpunk 2077 on Switch will probably forever remain a pipe-dream for Nintendo fans, but the Witcher 3's announcement shows that the small console hides a lot of power. We've prepared a list of seven open-world games we'd love to play on Switch.

Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice

Release date: 22 March 2019

Developer: FromSoftware

Publisher: Activision

We're closing with the youngest game listed here, which doesn't mean it's the easiest or most affordable of the set. This year's Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice turned out great, combining demanding, action-RPG gameplay a hallmark of From Software with extremely entertaining sneaking mechanics. It wouldn't be the first FormSoftware's game for the Switch, however this title goes to the remaster of the first Dark Souls, available on the platform since almost a year. Porting the entire series would be very laborious; jumping right into the latest installment seems a better idea, especially since that game brought about some much-desired, fresh mechanics.

Sekiro on Nintendo Switch  who would mind the downgrade, if the mechanics were there? - 2019-06-24
Sekiro on Nintendo Switch who would mind the downgrade, if the mechanics were there?

Once you look at the developer's back catalog, it won't be particularly surprising that Sekiro: Shadows Die Twice is not an easy game, which requires numerous attempts to certain levels and enemies why torture yourself at home if you can do it on your way to work! Good headphones will be mandatory here, however without proper audio, you won't make it too far. Sekiro would be a perfect fit for portable gaming, standing proudly in the same row with the refreshed Souls.

Last update: 2019-06-24

Daniel Stronski | Gamepressure.com

Why open world games suck at telling a story?
Why open world games suck at telling a story?

A great map, a slew of activities, and unlimited freedom usually come at the price of a forgettable, pretext storyline. Is that always the case? And does it have to be like that?

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